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"Separation of Thought & Thinker"
"Separation of Thought & Thinker"
"Separation of Thought & Thinker"
"Separation of Thought & Thinker"
"Separation of Thought & Thinker"
"Separation of Thought & Thinker"
"Separation of Thought & Thinker"

"Separation of Thought & Thinker"

Regular price $3,450.00 Sale

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Diptych, 24" x 52" each, Mixed media, hand spun yarn, illustration board, lavender edges

ART INSPIRATION // 
When I first started mediation,
 it felt strange and forced. But after hearing so many different experts weigh in about the transformative benefits, I was determined to give it a real shot. Like finding a boyfriend, I had to date around the different mediation apps before I found one that fit. Along the way I was exposed to a description of mediation offered by Dan Harris and Jeff Goldstein that really struck me. They likened one's steady stream of thoughts to that of the constant flow of a waterfall. When in a state of meditation, the goal is to distance yourself from the stream, as if you were seated behind the waterfall observing the current. This visual really crystalized it for me, and armed me with an exercise I could ask myself at any time - not just during mediation. Was I caught up in my head, at the mercy of unconscious thoughts? Or could I separate myself enough to witness my thoughts, deciding if this was really where I wanted to exert my energy, and if not, redirect them? While my journey with mediation is still a constant work in progress, I will say that I have noticed myself handle unexpected situations in a more calm, and less reactionary way. I also learned from research that the ideal meditation time is at least 12 minutes - anything less does not reap the benefits. Give it a try - and if you're a skeptic, Dan Harris is a good place to start.

SYMBOLISM //
Based on the above waterfall metaphor, "Separation of Thought & Thinker" takes the perspective as if you were witnessing a waterfall of thoughts from behind. Hand spun yarn dangle the painted boards that transition from dark to light blue as they cascade off the edges of the canvas. Each board has a silver-dipped white cap to add to the waterfall effect. The artwork itself is a diptych, creating literal space between the canvases - a nod to the separation of thought and thinker.

RECOMMENDED RESOURCES //
10% Happier app >"The Basics" Session 3, "Behind the Waterfall"
- Eckhart Tolle: Essential Teachings podcast, "Transcending the Self" episode dated May 19